Homemade Bone Broths for Joint Health and So Much More!

Dr. Cary Nelson, M.D. has summarized some of the benefits of bone broths very well in the short list I have included here. I make bone broths on a weekly basis and try to consume them throughout the year. Making bone broth is a very inexpensive way to stay healthy and feel great during the cold and flu season!

Here is Dr. Nelson’s list of benefits.

For your Immune system

The bones breakdown as they simmer, discharging an army of immune-boosting elements:

  1. The bone marrow releases myeloid and lymphoid stem cells – the building blocks of white blood cells (the ‘fighter’ cells that protect you from infections and viruses).
  2. The bones themselves slowly dissolve, allowing an extremely high concentration of essential minerals (such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc) to seep into the liquid.
  3. The collagen that breaks down to thicken the broth plays a fundamental role in wound-healing, helping your body rebuild itself.

For your Brain Function:
Bone marrow happens to be an excellent source of essential fatty acids, which have been clinically proven to improve overall brain function.

Bone broth also contains large quantities of an amino acid named glycine, which helps promote mental alertness, improves memory, and can even reduce stress.

For your Digestive Health:
Bone broth can also help relieve a wide array of gastrointestinal problems, such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Celiac disease, and leaky gut syndrome.

The gelatin that’s released from the bones actually works to heal damaged tissues in your intestinal lining – providing relief from chronic diarrhea, constipation, and even certain food sensitivities.

Bone broth can also:

  • Enhance the quality of your skin/hair
  • Protect your joints
  • Improve overall sleep quality
  • Strengthen bones

…and so much more.

As you can see, bone broth has countless health benefits crammed into every satisfying cup.

That’s why I consider bone broth a snack, an immune booster, and an energy drink…all rolled into one.

Bone broth also happens to be one of the most economical health aids out there – if you brew your own from scratch, you can have enough to last a week for less than $10.

 

The vinegar in the recipe below helps draw out the health benefits in the bones. I (Shanna) add chicken bones, an onion, 3-5 garlic cloves, carrots, celery tops, parsley, salt and pepper and 3 Tbs of vinegar to a crock pot with enough water to almost fill the crock pot. I keep veggie leftovers in a freezer bag. I just add chicken bones, etc to the bag in my freezer. When the bag is full, I run my crock pot for 24 hours. I put everything in at the same time. I keep it on a safe table in my garage and let it run for a day or more on the high setting, adding more water when needed. I strain the broth and use it throughout the week to drink or cook with. If you do not have a small holed colander, you can put two paper coffee filters in a large colander and pour the crock pot contents through that to strain the broth. Make sure the pot under your strainer is very large to catch everything!

Here is Dr. Nelson’s recipe-
It’s easy to make:

  1. Fill a slow cooker with as many bones as it will fit.
  2. Add ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar or 1-3 Tbsp.
  3. Fill the slow cooker the rest of the way with water and simmer on the lowest setting for at least 12 hours (24-36 is best).
  4. Add in a few of your favorite vegetables and herbs (such as onion, carrots, thyme, or rosemary) and leave on low for another 4-6 hours.
  5. Strain your mixture through a fine colander or sieve.

You can use leftover bones from a roasted chicken, or fresh bones from the butcher.

If you decide to use fresh beef bones for your broth, I recommend roasting them at 400 degrees for about 30 minutes on each side before they go in the pot, so you can get the optimal flavor.

Trust me…the extra step is more than worth it.

For your health,

Dr. Cary Nelson, MD
Director of Science & Nutrition
Probiotic America

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